A third-party in-kind contribution is a type of cost share on a Federal grant or cooperative agreement. 


This information applies to:

All grants and cooperative agreements


Contents

Authorities


2 CFR 200 Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards

§200.96 Third-party in-kind contributions.

Third-party in-kind contributions means the value of non-cash contributions (i.e., property or services) that—

(a) Benefit a federally assisted project or program; and

(b) Are contributed by non-Federal third parties, without charge, to a non-Federal entity under a Federal award.

[78 FR 78608, Dec. 26, 2013]

§200.306 Cost sharing or matching.    

(b) For all Federal awards, any shared costs or matching funds and all contributions, including cash and third party in-kind contributions, must be accepted as part of the non-Federal entity's cost sharing or matching when such contributions meet all
of the following criteria:

(1) Are verifiable from the non-Federal entity's records;

(2) Are not included as contributions for any other Federal award;

(3) Are necessary and reasonable for accomplishment of project or program objectives;

(4) Are allowable under Subpart E—Cost Principles of this part;

(5) Are not paid by the Federal Government under another Federal award, except where the Federal statute authorizing a program specifically provides that Federal funds made available for such program can be applied to matching or cost sharing requirements of other Federal programs;

(6) Are provided for in the approved budget when required by the Federal awarding agency; and

(7) Conform to other provisions of this part, as applicable.

[...]

(e) Volunteer services furnished by third-party professional and technical personnel, consultants, and other skilled and unskilled labor may be counted as cost sharing or matching if the service is an integral and necessary part of an approved project or program. Rates for third-party volunteer services must be consistent with those paid for similar work by the non-Federal entity. In those instances in which the required skills are not found in the non-Federal entity, rates must be consistent with those paid for similar work in the labor market in which the non-Federal entity competes for the kind of services involved. In either case, paid fringe benefits that are reasonable, necessary, allocable, and otherwise allowable may be included in the valuation.

(f) When a third-party organization furnishes the services of an employee, these services must be valued at the employee's regular rate of pay plus an amount of fringe benefits that is reasonable, necessary, allocable, and otherwise allowable, and indirect costs at either the third-party organization's approved federally negotiated indirect cost rate or, a rate in accordance with §200.414 Indirect (F&A) costs, paragraph (d), provided these services employ the same skill(s) for which the employee is normally paid. Where donated services are treated as indirect costs, indirect cost rates will separate the value of the donated services so that reimbursement for the donated services will not be made.

(g) Donated property from third parties may include such items as equipment, office supplies, laboratory supplies, or workshop and classroom supplies. Value assessed to donated property included in the cost sharing or matching share must not exceed the fair market value of the property at the time of the donation.

(h) The method used for determining cost sharing or matching for third-party-donated equipment, buildings and land for which title passes to the non-Federal entity may differ according to the purpose of the Federal award, if paragraph (h)(1) or (2) of this section applies.

(1) If the purpose of the Federal award is to assist the non-Federal entity in the acquisition of equipment, buildings or land, the aggregate value of the donated property may be claimed as cost sharing or matching.

(2) If the purpose of the Federal award is to support activities that require the use of equipment, buildings or land, normally only depreciation charges for equipment and buildings may be made. However, the fair market value of equipment or other capital assets and fair rental charges for land may be allowed, provided that the Federal awarding agency has approved the charges. See also §200.420 Considerations for selected items of cost.

(i) The value of donated property must be determined in accordance with the usual accounting policies of the non-Federal entity, with the following qualifications:

(1) The value of donated land and buildings must not exceed its fair market value at the time of donation to the non-Federal entity as established by an independent appraiser (e.g., certified real property appraiser or General Services Administration representative) and certified by a responsible official of the non-Federal entity as required by the Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970, as amended, (42 U.S.C. 4601-4655) (Uniform Act) except as provided in the implementing regulations at 49 CFR part 24.

(2) The value of donated equipment must not exceed the fair market value of equipment of the same age and condition at the time of donation.

(3) The value of donated space must not exceed the fair rental value of comparable space as established by an independent appraisal of comparable space and facilities in a privately-owned building in the same locality.

(4) The value of loaned equipment must not exceed its fair rental value.

(j) For third-party in-kind contributions, the fair market value of goods and services must be documented and to the extent feasible supported by the same methods used internally by the non-Federal entity.

[78 FR 78608, Dec. 26, 2013, as amended at 79 FR 75883, Dec. 19, 2014]

§200.434 Contributions and donations.

(a) Costs of contributions and donations, including cash, property, and services, from the non-Federal entity to other entities, are unallowable.

(b) The value of services and property donated to the non-Federal entity may not be charged to the Federal award either as a direct or indirect (F&A) cost. The value of donated services and property may be used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements (see §200.306 Cost sharing or matching). Depreciation on donated assets is permitted in accordance with §200.436 Depreciation, as long as the donated property is not counted towards cost sharing or matching requirements.

(c) Services donated or volunteered to the non-Federal entity may be furnished to a non-Federal entity by professional and technical personnel, consultants, and other skilled and unskilled labor. The value of these services may not be charged to the Federal award either as a direct or indirect cost. However, the value of donated services may be used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements in accordance with the provisions of §200.306 Cost sharing or matching.

(d) To the extent feasible, services donated to the non-Federal entity will be supported by the same methods used to support the allocability of regular personnel services.

(e) The following provisions apply to nonprofit organizations. The value of services donated to the nonprofit organization utilized in the performance of a direct cost activity must be considered in the determination of the non-Federal entity's indirect cost rate(s) and, accordingly, must be allocated a proportionate share of applicable indirect costs when the following circumstances exist:

(1) The aggregate value of the services is material;

(2) The services are supported by a significant amount of the indirect costs incurred by the non-Federal entity;

(i) In those instances where there is no basis for determining the fair market value of the services rendered, the non-Federal entity and the cognizant agency for indirect costs must negotiate an appropriate allocation of indirect cost to the services.

(ii) Where donated services directly benefit a project supported by the Federal award, the indirect costs allocated to the services will be considered as a part of the total costs of the project. Such indirect costs may be reimbursed under the Federal award or used to meet cost sharing or matching requirements.

(f) Fair market value of donated services must be computed as described in §200.306 Cost sharing or matching.

(g) Personal Property and Use of Space.

(1) Donated personal property and use of space may be furnished to a non-Federal entity. The value of the personal property and space may not be charged to the Federal award either as a direct or indirect cost.

(2) The value of the donations may be used to meet cost sharing or matching share requirements under the conditions described in §§200.300 Statutory and national policy requirements through 200.309 Period of performance of subpart D of this part. The value of the donations must be determined in accordance with §§200.300 Statutory and national policy requirements through 200.309 Period of performance. Where donations are treated as indirect costs, indirect cost rates will separate the value of the donations so that reimbursement will not be made.

[78 FR 78608, Dec. 26, 2013, as amended at 79 FR 75886, Dec. 19, 2014]

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Frequently Asked Questions


How is the value determined for donated services?

Volunteer services or unpaid services provided to a grantee or subgrantee by individuals will be valued at rates consistent with those ordinarily paid for similar work in the grantee’s or subgrantee’s organization. If the grantee or subgrantee does not have employees performing similar work, the rates will be consistent with those ordinarily paid by other employers for similar work in the same labor market. In either case, a reasonable amount for fringe benefits may be included in the valuation.

When an employer other than a grantee, subgrantee, or cost-type contractor furnishes free of charge the services of an employee in the employee’s normal line of work, the services will be valued at the employee’s regular rate of pay exclusive of the employee’s fringe benefits and overhead costs.

How are volunteer donated services properly documented?

To the extent feasible, volunteer services will be supported by the same methods that the organization uses to support the allocability of regular personnel costs. In general this means time and activity reporting sheets should be completed and should include:

  • Each volunteer by name

  • The date volunteer hours were donated

  • The number of hours volunteered

  • The activity that was performed by the volunteer

  • A signature of each volunteer 

  • A signature or initials of an authorized agency official who reviewed and approved the time and activity report 

How is the value determined for donated supplies and loaned equipment or space?

If a third party donates supplies, the contribution will be valued at the market value of the supplies at the time of donation.

If a third party donates the use of equipment or space in a building but retains title, the contribution will be valued at the fair rental rate of the equipment or space.

If a third party donates equipment, buildings, or land, and title passes to a grantee or subgrantee, the treatment of the donated property will depend upon the purpose of the grant or subgrant, as follows:

(1) Awards for capital expenditures. If the purpose of the grant or subgrant is to assist the grantee or subgrantee in the acquisition of property, the market value of that property at the time of donation may be counted as cost sharing or matching,

(2) Other awards. If assisting in the acquisition of property is not the purpose of the grant or subgrant, the following will apply:

  • If approval is obtained from the awarding agency, the market value at the time of donation of the donated equipment or buildings and the fair rental rate of the donated land may be counted as cost sharing or matching. In the case of a subgrant, the terms of the grant agreement may require that the approval be obtained from the Federal agency as well as the grantee. In all cases, the approval may be given only if a purchase of the equipment or rental of the land would be approved as an allowable direct cost. If any part of the donated property was acquired with Federal funds, only the non-Federal share of the property may be counted as cost-sharing or matching.

  • If approval is not obtained under paragraph (e)(2)(i) of this section, no amount may be counted for donated land, and only depreciation or use allowances may be counted for donated equipment and buildings. The depreciation or use allowances for this property are not treated as third party in-kind contributions. Instead, they are treated as costs incurred by the grantee or subgrantee. They are computed and allocated (usually as indirect costs) in accordance with the cost principles specified in § 12.62, in the same way as depreciation or use allowances for purchased equipment and buildings. The amount of depreciation or use allowances for donated equipment and buildings is based on the property’s market value at the time it was donated.

How is the value determined for real property donated by a grantee or subgrantee for the purpose of construction or acquisition?

If a grantee or subgrantee donates real property for a construction or facilities acquisition project, the current market value of that property may be counted as cost sharing or matching. If any part of the donated property was acquired with Federal funds, only the non-Federal share of the property may be counted as cost sharing or matching.

May I use prison labor as in-kind match on my grant?

Prison labor from state and local correctional institutions is allowable in-kind match, as long as the costs meet the allowable cost criteria from the applicable cost principles.   Grantees may not use labor from Federal institutions, match must come from a non-federal source.  Whether the prisoners receive minimal compensation from the correctional institution for their services is immaterial for the purposes of determining allowable costs for third party in-kind in this situation. 

How would I value prison labor used as in-kind match?

Prison labor should be valued at the cost the grantee or subgrantee would have paid for the service.  Typically, prisoners perform manual labor services on grants.  In this case, the most appropriate rate would be the Federal minimum wage.  

Is the value of youth labor allowable as in-kind match on my grant? 

Yes, volunteer in-kind services provided by youth organizations or individuals are allowable, as long as the costs meet the allowable cost criteria from the applicable cost principles.

Is there a minimum age requirement necessary in order to document and use youth in-kind on my grant and comply with the Fair Labor Standard Act?

No. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) defines employment very broadly, i.e., "to suffer or permit to work." However, the Supreme Court has made it clear that the FLSA was not intended "to stamp all persons as employees who without any express or implied compensation agreement might work for their own advantage on the premises of another." In administering the FLSA, the Department of Labor follows this judicial guidance in the case of individuals serving as unpaid volunteers in various community services. Individuals who volunteer or donate their services, usually on a part-time basis, for public service, religious or humanitarian objectives, not as employees and without contemplation of pay, are not considered employees of the religious, charitable or similar non-profit organizations that receive their service.  This information was obtained from the U.S. Department of Labor website at the following address: http://www.dol.gov/elaws/esa/flsa/docs/volunteers.asp

How would I value in-kind labor donations from a youth? 

Youth labor should be valued at the cost the grantee or subgrantee would have paid for the service.  You should consider whether the work performed by the youth is equal to the work performed by a State employee and make valuation adjustments accordingly.

Can I use an in-kind donation from the National Guard?

Yes, the donation of personnel time is an allowable in-kind match, as long as the costs meet the allowable cost criteria from the applicable cost principles.  The donation of equipment time is not allowable, as the Federal government typically funds equipment for the National Guard.  

Can I use time contributed by AmeriCorps interns as in-kind match?

No,  Although these volunteers may work on federally-funded projects, their services may not be used by a grantee to fulfill the match requirement to federal grant program funds.  Americorps funding ultimately comes from the Federal Government, and therefore a federally funded volunteer organization such as Americorps, and any of their assets cannot be used to contribute to the matching requirement on a Federal grant.

The Assistant Inspector General for the Corporation for National and Community Service, their Director of Grants Management, as well as grants managers for other federally-funded volunteer organizations were consulted on this issue. 

What is a third party for the purposes of in-kind?

An entity that does not have a financial interest in the transaction.  If the entity is receiving funding from the financial assistance transaction either as a subrecipient or vendor/contractor, they are not considered a third party.  A common third party entity is a volunteer who works on a grant or cooperative agreement funded education program.  

A subrecipient is offering to discount part of the cost of the work they are contributing to a grant/cooperative agreement.  If they are not third party, is there a way I can count the value of the services as match?

Yes, these costs are called discounted services.  If the costs are eligible and allowable costs, they can be documented and claimed as match on the award.  Please note, that all non-cash transactions present a higher audit risk for the recipient.  The recipient should ensure that a proper value of the discount has been determined and documented in the recipient award file.  If you are unsure of how to value the contribution, please consult your FWS representative. 

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Learning Aids


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Related Pages


Voluntary Committed Cost Share

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Resources


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References


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